Shell 12 Life Saving Rules

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Shell's 12 Life-Saving Rules.

The following are Shell’s 12 Life Saving Rules and how they should be followed by employees and contractors. The bottom line is, if you choose to break the rules, you choose not to work for Shell.

Contents

Work with a valid Work Permit when required.

This rule is associated with the US Safe System of Work and the Global Permit to Work system. It doesn’t apply to permits obtained through oversight agencies, such as encroachment permits, drilling permits, grading permits, building permits, etc. Those permits need to be obtained where required, and not having those permits can result in fines imposed by the oversight agencies, but this Life Saving Rule is specific to the Safe System of Work and the Global Permit to Work System. A Work Permit describes what you must do to stay safe.

You should:

  • Understand the Work Permit and follow it.
  • Confirm that the Work permit is valid.
  • Confirm with the Supervisor or the Person in Charge of the work that it is safe to start work.

If you are the Supervisor or the Person in Charge of the work you should:

  • Confirm if a Work Permit is required for this work.
  • Confirm that the workplace has been inspected before work starts.
  • Explain how the Work Permit is signed.
  • Confirm the Work Permit is signed.
  • Confirm that it is safe to start work.
  • Get a new Work Permit when the work or the situation changes.
  • Confirm that the work is completed.

Conduct Gas Tests when required.

The air should be tested to prevent explosions and/or make sure the workers and people on-site can breathe the air safely.

You should:

  • Confirm with the Supervisor or the Person in Charge of the work that the air is tested.
  • Confirm with the Supervisor or the Person in Charge of the work that it is safe to start work.
  • Stop work if you smell gas.

If you are a Gas Tester you should:

  • Understand which tests the Work Permit requires and how often.
  • Use certified equipment for the tests.

If you are the Supervisor or the Person in Charge of the work you should:

  • Confirm that gas testing is carried out as per Work Permit.
  • Request more gas tests if necessary to keep the workers safe.
  • Confirm that it is safe to start work.

Verify isolation before work begins and use the specified life protecting equipment.

Isolation separates the worker and keeps them safe from the many dangers that can exist at any given job site. There is always a risk around any electricity, pressure, toxic materials, poisonous gas, chemicals, hot liquids, or radiation. Specified life-protecting equipment, such as breathing apparatus, electrical arc flash protection, or chemical resistant suits help to protect from danger.

You should:

  • Understand the isolations that protect you from danger.
  • Confirm with the Supervisor or the Person in Charge of the work that isolations are in place.
  • Confirm with the Supervisor or the Person in Charge of the work that it is safe to start work.

If you are the Supervisor or the Person in Charge of the work you should:

  • Confirm isolation is in place, for example, lock switches, separate pipes with spades, or lock access doors.
  • Confirm no stored energy or other dangers remain.
  • Confirm that it is safe to start work.

Obtain authorization before entering a confined space.

A confined space, such as a vessel, tank or pipe, can contain explosive gas, poisonous air or other dangers such as lack of oxygen, things that can fall on you or you can fall from. Authorised access keeps everyone safe.

You should:

  • Confirm with the Supervisor or the Person in Charge of the work that it is safe to start work.
  • Confirm with the Attendant that you can enter a confined space.
  • Follow the requirements of the Work Permit.

If you are the Attendant you should:

  • Approve and control access to a confined space.
  • Have means of communication with people in the confined space.

If you are the Supervisor or the Person in Charge of the work you should:

  • Confirm that the requirements of the Work Permit are in place.
  • Confirm that a qualified Attendant is always present when people are in a confined space.
  • Confirm that gas testing is carried out as per Work Permit.
  • Confirm that it is safe to start work.

Obtain authorization before overriding or disabling safety critical equipment.

Obviously, safety-critical equipment must work correctly to keep workers safe. Some xamples of safety-critical equipment include isolation devices/emergency shut down valves, lock out/tag out devices, trip systems, relief valves, fire and gas alarm systems, certain level controls, alarms, crane computers and In-Vehicle Monitoring Systems.

You should:

  • Obtain authorisation from the Supervisor or the Person in Charge before overriding or disabling safety-critical equipment.

If you are the Supervisor or the Person in Charge you should:

  • Point our the safety-critical equipment in your work place.
  • Confirm the authorisation comes from the right level.

Protect Yourself against a fall when working at height.

Always use fall protection equipment when working outside a protective environment where you can fall over 1.8 metres (6 feet) to keep you safe. A protective environment includes approved scaffolds, stairs with handrails and man lifts.

You should:

  • Have authorization to work at height outside a protective environment.
  • Be aware of what fall protection equipment to use and how to use it.
  • Check equipment before using it.
  • Always tie off when at height outside of a protective environment.

If you are the Supervisor or the Person in Charge of the work you should:

  • Confirm that it is safe to start work at height.

Do not walk under a suspended load.

Working or walking immediately under a suspended load is unsafe as the load can fall on you. A suspended load is an object that is temporarily lifted and hangs above the ground. (Rig floors are excluded from this rule).

You should:

  • Never cross a barrier controlling an area with a suspended load without authorization.
  • Follow the instructions of the Flagman or the Person in Charge of the lift.

If you are the Person in Charge of the lift you should:

  • Mark the unsafe area and put barriers in place.
  • Ensure that nobody walks under a suspended load.

Do not smoke outside of designated smoking areas.

Smoking or use of matches or cigarette lighters could set on fire flammable materials. Designated smoking areas, such as a smoking hut or a smoking room, will keep you safe from causing fire and explosion.

You should:

  • Know where the designated smoking areas are.
  • Intervene if you see someone smoking outside a designated area.

If you are the Supervisor or Person in Charge you should:

  • Inform people about designated smoking areas.
  • Ensure that designated smoking areas are clearly marked.

No alcohol or drugs while working or driving.

Using alcohol, illegal drugs and misusing legal drugs or other substances will reduce your ability to do your job safely.

You should:

  • Always inform the Supervisor or the Person in Charge if you are taking medicine that may have an affect on your performance.
  • If in doubt always check with the Supervisor or the Person in Charge who may seek medical advice.
  • Not use, keep, sell or distribute illegal drugs.
  • Intervene if you see a case of alcohol or drugs abuse.

If you are the Supervisor or Person in Charge you should:

  • Only assign work to people who are fit to work.

While driving, do not use your phone and do not exceed speed limits.

Speeding or using your phone while driving increases the risk of losing control of your vehicle.

If you are a Driver you should:

  • Not use a mobile phone or pager, send or read a text message, or use a hands-free mobile phone device.
  • Stay at or below the maximum allowable speed for the road your are driving on as indicated by road signs or Journey Management instructions.
  • Stay at or below the maximum allowable speed limit for the vehicle you are driving.
  • Adjust your speed to the prevailing conditions.

If you are a Passenger you should:

  • Intervene if a Driver is using a phone in a moving vehicle.
  • Intervene if a Driver is exceeding the maximum allowable speed.

Wear your seat belt.

This rule is one of the most often violated, as people often don’t think that driving even a short distance requires a seatbelt. A seatbelt protects you from injury in the event of an incident while driving and keeps you safe. No matter how small of a distance or how slow the speed, safety belts should always ben used, whether in (rental) cars, taxis, (mini) buses, trucks, cranes, or forklift trucks, and the situation involves persons in moving vehicles when engaged on Shell business. Putting on a seatbelt should be a well formed habit. The only exceptions include vehicles where only lap seatbelts are available or in public transport where seat belts are not available.

You (Drivers and Passengers) should:

  • Always use a 3-point seatbelt (please note exceptions above).
  • Check that your seatbelt works properly.
  • Keep your seatbelt properly fastened while in a moving vehicle.
  • Check that everyone in the vehicle is wearing a seatbelt properly before starting to drive.
  • Intervene when your fellow passengers are not wearing seatbelts properly.

Follow prescribed Journey Management Plan.

A Journey Management Plan is a plan for you as a Driver that will help you to travel and arrive safely.

Journey Management Plans are required for any travel time that is over 4.5 hours.

If you are a Driver you should:

  • Confirm if a Journey Management Plan is required before starting the journey.
  • Discuss the Journey Management Plan with the authorised person.
  • Understand the Journey Management Plan before starting the journey.
  • Comply with the duty, driving and rest hours specified in the Journey Management Plan.
  • Follow the route specified in the Journey Management Plan.
  • Always tell the authorised person immediately if changes occur.

If you are the Supervisor or Person in Charge you should routinely:

  • Check that the Journey Management Plan is in place and being followed.
  • Check that the Driver understands and complies with the Journey Management Plan.

External links